World’s First Carbon-Neutral National Park

National Geographic Education Blog

ENVIRONMENT

A remote national park on the banks of the Zambezi River in Zambia is leading the way in reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. (Nat Geo Voices blog)

Watch our “Picture of Practice” video to better understand how students think about contributions to carbon footprints.

Teachers, scroll down for a quick list of key resources in our Teachers’ Toolkit, including today’s MapMaker Interactive map.

These lovely Loxodontas are as carbon-neutral (plants in, poop out) as the park in which they’re found, Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia. Photograph by Hanay, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-3.0 These lovely Loxodontas are as carbon-neutral (plants in, poop out) as the park in which they’re found, Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia.
Photograph by Hanay, courtesy Wikimedia. CC-BY-3.0

Discussion Ideas

  • The great news out of Zambia is that the 4,000-square-kilometer (1,545-square-mile) Lower Zambezi National Park is now carbon neutral. What does “carbon neutral” mean?
    • Carbon neutrality describes a situation in which a person, organization, or other entity produces (emits) no more greenhouse gases than it consumes.
    • This does not mean that the lodges and…

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